Aqua Colorant
Avocado Oil
Beeswax
Castor Oil
Citric Acid
Cocoa Butter
Coconut Oil
Cold Process Method
Distilled Water
Emuslifying Wax
Essential Oil
Flavor Oil
Fractionated Coconut Oil
Fragrance Oil
Glycerin
Hemp Seed Oil
Jojoba Oil
Kukui Nut Oil
Mango Butter
Natural Oil
Olive Oil
Oxide Colorant
Palm Oil
Saponification
Shea Butter
Sodium Hydroxide
Stearic Acid
Sweet Almond Oil
Ultramarines
Vitamin E (250)
Vitamin E (T-50)
Wheatgerm Oil











Aqua Colorant

Approved by the FDA for use in cosmetics and used to color soaps.



Avocado Oil

Obtained from the avocado pear. Avocado Oil is one of the most effective skin care ingredients. It is highly therapeutic and contains protein, amino acids, and many nutrients, including vitamins A, B1, B2, D, and E. This oil is highly recommended to those with skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis, and other skin irritations; also, avocado oil is known to help regenerate skin cells, soften tissue, and heal scaly skin.

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Beeswax

Produced by worker honey bees, beeswax is a wonderful additive to lip balms because of its natural hardening properies and because it forms a protective layer on the skin.



Castor Oil

Like olive oil and jojoba oil, it attracts and retains moisture to the skin. It is easily absorbed into the skin, and actually helps your skin to absorb other less-easily penetrating oils. Castor oil acts as a barrier against harsh conditions, and makes an nice bar of soap that is soothing to the skin. The moisturizing quality of castor oil makes it a nice oil to use for shampoo bars as well.

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Citric Acid

Derived from citrus fruits and used in lotions and creams for its preservative and pH lowering qualities.



Cocoa Butter

A good moisturizer because it forms a protective layer that holds moisture in the skin. It contributes to a hard bar of soap that conditions and softens the skin.

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Coconut Oil

Derived from dried coconut meat, it contributes to a hard bar of soap with a soft fluffy lather. It has long been used for skin and hair care in the Pacific Islands and is a very good moisturizing oil for dry, sensative skin. Coconut oil is a mild, gentle oil that serves as a protective layer to help retain moisture in your skin; also, it is the main lather-producing oil used in soap.



Cold Process Method

The most simple method of making soap and uses no complex chemical additives. The acidic oils react with the basic lye to form soap with no external heat added during saponification. Glycerin, a natural byproduct of soap, is not extracted from the soap, helping to moisturize the skin.

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Distilled Water

Used for the saponification of oils in soapmaking. When used in lotions and creams, it is the agent that draws the oils into your skin.



Emulsifying Wax

Used in lotions and creams to bind (emulsify) oil with water and prevent them from separating.

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Essential Oil

Scents derived from the leaves, stems, berries, flowers, petals, bark or twigs of plants and herbs and contain the beneficial properties of the plant from which itís derived.



Flavor Oils

Fragrance oils that are approved for use in lip products.

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Fractionated Coconut Oil

A light oil that is excellent when used in lotions because of itís non-greasy feel. It is coconut oil that has been separated (fractionated) to remove the heavier, more greasy substances in the oil. It is an emmolient oil and easily absorbed by the skin.



Fragrance Oils

Synthetically produced fragrances that are made to resemble essential oils. They are usually made from a combination of essential oils and synthetic aromatic compounds.

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Glycerin

A vegetable derived humectant, meaning it has the ability to draw moisture from the air and bring it close to your skin. Glycerin is a by-product of commercial soap manufacture and in the soap industry, they remove the glycerin from soap because it is valuable when sold as a separate comodity. This is one reason that commercial soaps are so drying to the skin.



Hemp Seed Oil

Derived from the seed of the Cannabis satvia plant, also known as the marijuana plant. This oil is rich in nutrients and essential fatty acids, which help prevent skin from aging. It is easily absorbed in the skin and works as a barrier to retain moisture. Hemp seed oil is also said to have the ability to heal and restore damaged skin.



Jojoba Oil

A rich, nourishing oil that penetrates quickly, and is very similar to our skinís own sebum, which softens and lubricates the skin. This oil has been used for skin and hair care for hundreds of years and it contains an anti-inflamatory, which makes this a good oil for arthritis and rheumatism. Jojoba Oil makes a great scalp cleanser and conditioner when used in shampoo bars and is excellent in controlling oily skin and acne.

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Kukui Nut Oil

Extracted from the fruit of the kukui nut tree, the official state tree of Hawaii. Native Hawaiians have used this oil for hundreds of years to soothe dry and chapped skin. This oil is high in lineolic acids, which are essential to healthy skin, and is readily absorbed into the skin. Kukui nut oil creates a stable lather and is a good conditioning oil for shampoo bars.



Mango Butter

Extracted from the kernels of the mango tree. Mango butter is said to prevent drying skin and wrinkle formation and is also known for its ability to reduce cellular degeneration. It is a very moisturizing and soothing oil; also, mango butter restores flexibility to the skin and lends protection against the sun.

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Natural Oil

Fragrances naturally derived from plants. They are different from essential oils in that the fragrance is not obtained from one plant, but the fragrances from several plants are combined to create a scent.



Olive Oil

An excellent moisturizer because it attracts moisture from the air and holds it close to the skin. Olive oil retains moisture in your skin, yet unlike many other oils, it allows the normal functions of the skin, such as sweating and shedding of dead skin, to occur.

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Oxide Colorants

Colorants approved by the FDA for use in cosmetics. We use them to color soaps.



Palm Oil

A mild oil extracted from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Palm oil, when used in combination with coconut and olive oil, creates a nice hard bar of soap with a stable lather that cleans well and resists dissolving.

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Saponification

The process of combining oils with lye (sodium hydroxide) to make soap. The acidic oils react with the basic oils to form a neutral, gentle bar of soap. This process takes 18-24 hours.



Shea Butter

Extracted from the African Butter Tree, shea butter has been used by African Healers for hundreds of years to treat dry and aging skin. Shea butter is extremely moisturizing and gentle to the skin, and has many natural benefits including natural sun protection and the ability to repair degenerated skin cells.

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Sodium Hydroxide (Lye)

An alkali base that is used in soapmaking to saponify the oils and make soap. (see saponification)



Stearic Acid

A fatty acid naturally found in most oils. We use stearic acid that is derived from soybeans and it is basically used as a thickener and stabilizer for creams and lotions.

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Sweet Almond Oil

Derived from almond kernels and is well known for its ability to soften, soothe, and condition skin. It is rich in vitamins and minerals and is a great moisturizing oil for eczema, itchy, dry, and inflamed skin.



Ultramarines

Non-toxic, inorganic colorants approved by the FDA for use in cosmetics.

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Vitamin E (250)

A great additive to lip balms because of its ability to soften, moisturize, and soothe chapped skin. Vitamin E also reduces the damaging effects of the sun.



Vitamin E (T-50)

A natural anti-oxidant which preserves oils and prevent rancidity.

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Wheatgerm Oil

Extracted from the germ of the wheat kernel. It is rich in vitamins A, B, D, and especially E, and is said to have powerful healing effects. It is a very nourishing oil and is especially good for dry and aging skin.



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